thesassylorax:

jaclcfrost:

jaclcfrost:

comedy gold

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it just keeps getting better

Owl you can fly

(Source: jaclcfrost, via ruinedchildhood)

violentnewcontinent:

weneeddiversebooks:

Sure, #weneeddiversebooks so that my future kids know they can be heroes…
…but we also need diverse books so that white readers know my kids can be heroes, too.

violentnewcontinent:

weneeddiversebooks:

Sure, #weneeddiversebooks so that my future kids know they can be heroes…

…but we also need diverse books so that white readers know my kids can be heroes, too.

(via mrsfrisco)

chicagopubliclibrary:

Life Advice from Harper Lee 
From Letters of Note: 

A young fan of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ named Jeremy wrote to Harper Lee in 2006, and asked for a signed photo. He didn’t get one, but instead received this lovely piece of advice from the author that is far more precious. 

Harper Lee announced today - on her 88th birthday — that ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ will now be released as an audiobook and e-book. 
Happy Birthday, Harper! 

chicagopubliclibrary:

Life Advice from Harper Lee 

From Letters of Note

A young fan of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ named Jeremy wrote to Harper Lee in 2006, and asked for a signed photo. He didn’t get one, but instead received this lovely piece of advice from the author that is far more precious. 

Harper Lee announced today - on her 88th birthday — that ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ will now be released as an audiobook and e-book. 

Happy Birthday, Harper! 

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

I wish I could move like him.

I wish I could move like him.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via ruinedchildhood)

smartgirlsattheparty:

womenrockscience:

Stunning images of graduates from the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (now Drexel University). The University was founded in 1850 and is one of the first institutions in the world to train women in medicine and offer them an M.D degree.

[Right click and open in new tab to view larger versions]

Thanks to Drexel University for maintaining the archives:http://archives.drexelmed.edu/

Smart Girl Doctors!

Are any of you Smarties in medical school? Want to attend medical school? Already finished with medical school?

:)

wishingondisney:

STILL THE FUNNIEST THING EVER 

(Source: 42g33ks, via ruinedchildhood)

sonofbaldwin:

Lots of religious folk assure me that their religions are “tolerant” of the marginalized or that they, themselves, do not conform to the oppressive ideas their religions or fellow parishioners tout, that the bigoted members or leadership or scriptures are, in fact, the minority viewpoints.

I’m always suspect of such a position because it seems, to me, to try to minimize the impact these harmful philosophies have on those they are targeted against and it neglects to address the fact that if these are the “minority viewpoints” why they are so prevalent, able to garner so much attention, and wreak so much havoc on the lives of the marginalized.

The “minority viewpoint” argument also allows people defending their gods and religions to circumvent or outright ignore the responsibility they have in educating their institutions, speaking out PUBLICLY (not privately) against their institutions when those institutions engage in institutionalized bigotry, preventing their institutions from causing emotional, physical, and psychological violence, and, barring all of that, helping to tear down those institutions when they continuously fail to behave morally, or corrupt the word “moral” so thoroughly that it cannot be distinguished from “immoral.”

That is why I side-eye all religious folk except a select few, like Archbishop Desmond Tutu or Bishop Christopher Senyonjo.

I respect and have love for religious people like them because they don’t lie—not to me or themselves—just to save face, or in service to their pride and ignorance. They don’t try to defend their religions or justify bigotry in the names of their gods. They don’t tell me they are the majority and the bigots are the minority—because they know better. They are critical of their religions and their gods and they speak of love and humanity and the responsibility we have to one another even in the face of the overwhelming hatred of their fellow religious folk.

They tell you straight up: If my religion is bigoted, if my god is bigoted, then I can no longer serve. And if my religion and my god are not bigoted, then my life must be a demonstration of that.

These are the folks that will stand up and walk out of a bigoted sermon their religious leader gives or will confront their religious leader about their bigotry *resolutely.* These are the people who will not give their church or their mosque or their temple or their synagogue a damn dime until they change their orientation to one of abundant love and acceptance.  

Those are the ONLY kinds of religious people I can fuck with.

The others? Well, Mobb Deep said it best (though, perhaps, they didn’t mean it like I mean it here—or maybe they did):

"Ain’t no such things as halfway crooks. Scared to death and scared to look. They shook."

And I don’t fuck with shook ones because they can’t be trusted.

pugsofinstagram:

Yep Cecil is pretty awesome. Please follow @thecubanpug !#pug #pugs #pugsofinstagram

How I look when I try to straighten my posture.

pugsofinstagram:

Yep Cecil is pretty awesome. Please follow @thecubanpug !#pug #pugs #pugsofinstagram

How I look when I try to straighten my posture.

archivesofamericanart:

The Armory Show wasn’t the only big event in 1913 - it was also the year that suffragists marched on Washington to demand women’s right to vote. In light of that centennial anniversary, which is being celebrated this weekend, and the kickoff of Women’s History Month, it seemed like a good time to present you with this declaration from Nancy Spero.
Nancy Spero letter to Lucy R. Lippard, 1971 Oct. 29. Lucy R. Lippard papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

archivesofamericanart:

The Armory Show wasn’t the only big event in 1913 - it was also the year that suffragists marched on Washington to demand women’s right to vote. In light of that centennial anniversary, which is being celebrated this weekend, and the kickoff of Women’s History Month, it seemed like a good time to present you with this declaration from Nancy Spero.

Nancy Spero letter to Lucy R. Lippard, 1971 Oct. 29. Lucy R. Lippard papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

fishingboatproceeds:

The Fault in Our Stars is my fourth (4.5th?) novel, and it has found a very wide readership. I often get questions asking what my secret is, or why the book has been successful, and then of course there are also lots of people out there speculating about the reasons for the book’s success.

So…